9 Comments

  1. Lucien
    01/07/2017 @ 11:34 am

    I love your new theme, it looks awesome and perfect for the winter season. :D

    Yo’re right about that; I didn’t notice until you pointed it out, but the owner is indeed a bit like that….but until the service is good – and it is, I recently bought a domain from her and have had no problems – competitivity is not really a con/flaw in my opinion. :)

    By they way, thank you for updating my link. :)

    Reply

    • Adri
      01/07/2017 @ 4:11 pm

      I still think that lying to a potential client and then denying service for unknown reasons is unethical business practice. I’m not just talking about web hosting services, but just any sort of service in general. I feel that if we’re talking about “personal” reseller web hosting services and that if there are any requirements (ie. sample website, knowledge of FTP, etc., for example), then they shouldn’t be denied the service whatsoever, especially when no rules are broken.

      I think I’m missing a few people with the link updates, but for now, it’s just you, Jamie, and another person who I recently linked. I also removed some people from the Exits section because, even though we barely talk/communicate, there are a few of them who are bullying my other friends. I don’t condone bullies for whatever reason they may have, especially if the incidents happened eons ago, you know?

      Anyway, talk to you later!
      Adri recently posted Welcome ADRICULOUS 4! on her blog!My Profile

      Reply

  2. Tamz
    01/08/2017 @ 1:49 pm

    The concept of child themes and parent themes are still quite alien to me. I think I need to spend more time in the WordPress Codex.
    Tamz recently posted Wrapping up the Sixteen on her blog!My Profile

    Reply

    • Adri
      01/08/2017 @ 4:40 pm

      It’s basically like you’re creating your own theme, but you are using some core files from the original theme. The only thing that’s different is your CSS file and (optional) your header.php file, footer.php file, etc., depending on how you want to customize/modify them.

      Say, for example, I have the Twenty Sixteen theme. I want to modify/customize the entire theme without messing with the core files of the Twenty Sixteen theme. So, I create a new theme folder, I call it something like “My 2016 Child Theme” or whatever, then I create a new style.css and save it in that folder and include the required meta text on top (as stated in the Codex) so that your style.css reads the original Twenty Sixteen core files. Then, with that style.css, you can add in your custom CSS to each of the elements you want to modify/customize (ie. font type, font size, colors, etc.). You can also create new header.php, footer.php, etc. if you really want to add your own custom changes and save it in that folder. Then, you upload it in the “themes” folder and then your dashboard will read your new child theme folder as a new theme. For the child theme to work, your original theme (for instance, the Twenty Sixteen theme) must be installed, but you activate your child theme folder instead.

      I know it’s not much detail, but that’s the gist of what a child theme is like.
      Adri recently posted 2017 is very bright in Eos on her blog!My Profile

      Reply

      • Tamz
        01/08/2017 @ 6:36 pm

        That is very good information on child/parent theme. Thanks. It makes sense. The “other” files on themes (at least from the “made by WordPress” themes I have here) seem to be quite complicated. Making child themes lessen the complication. I feel that starting from scratch would require intermediate knowledge of PHP, at least when I was looking at it from the WordPress Editor.
        Tamz recently posted Wrapping up the Sixteen on her blog!My Profile

        Reply

        • Adri
          01/08/2017 @ 6:49 pm

          It’s actually a recommended practice by WordPress when you want to customize a base theme. That’s why there are a lot of barebones/starter themes that you can use (both free and premium) that has nothing on it, but has a lot of features hidden in them. You just create a child theme and do your own designing using that method, and then the child theme can adopt all of the original theme’s files and features (the ones you don’t want to mess/touch with). It helps too because when your original theme has an update, your child theme will also protect your design and customizations from getting overriden by the upgraded files.

          Here’s the original/parent theme of my blog. If you look at the examples, my blog child theme looks absolutely nothing compared to the examples they showed here: https://themify.me/themes/ultra
          Adri recently posted 2017 is very bright in Eos on her blog!My Profile

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        • Adri
          01/08/2017 @ 6:50 pm

          Also, there are plugins too where it enables you to create child themes instead of doing them from scratch as an option.
          Adri recently posted 2017 is very bright in Eos on her blog!My Profile

          Reply

  3. Maroon Caludin
    01/15/2017 @ 12:46 pm

    Oh it has a unique feel to it! Looks great!

    Reply

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